Boucing Grey Bow Tie Ribbon

Playlist

01. alto giove
02. moonlight sonata
03. für elise
04. libiamo ne'lieti calici
05. swan lake ballet
piety-patience-modesty-distrust:

A monument to Tsar Alexander III in front of Christ the Savior Cathedral in Moscow

piety-patience-modesty-distrust:

A monument to Tsar Alexander III in front of Christ the Savior Cathedral in Moscow

russiathegreat:

The Bolshoi Theatre

russiathegreat:

The Bolshoi Theatre

teatimeatwinterpalace:

The German Emperor, Wilhelm II, and the Russian Tsar, Nicholas II, exchanged telegrams in the immediate run-up to the outbreak of war between 29 July 1914 and 1 August 1914.

Tsar to Kaiser29 July 1914, 1 a.m.Peter’s Court Palais, 29 July 1914Sa Majesté l’EmpereurNeues PalaisAm glad you are back. In this serious moment, I appeal to you to help me. An ignoble war has been declared to a weak country. The indignation in Russia shared fully by me is enormous. I foresee that very soon I shall be overwhelmed by the pressure forced upon me and be forced to take extreme measures which will lead to war. To try and avoid such a calamity as a European war I beg you in the name of our old friendship to do what you can to stop your allies from going too far.

Kaiser to Tsar29 July 1914, 1.45 a.m. (this and the previous telegraph crossed)28 July 1914It is with the gravest concern that I hear of the impression which the action of Austria against Serbia is creating in your country.The unscrupulous agitation that has been going on in Serbia for years has resulted in the outrageous crime, to which Archduke Francis Ferdinand fell a victim. The spirit that led Serbians to murder their own king and his wife still dominates the country.You will doubtless agree with me that we both, you and me, have a common interest as well as all Sovereigns to insist that all the persons morally responsible for the dastardly murder should receive their deserved punishment. In this case politics plays no part at all.On the other hand, I fully understand how difficult it is for you and your Government to face the drift of your public opinion. Therefore, with regard to the hearty and tender friendship which binds us both from long ago with firm ties, I am exerting my utmost influence to induce the Austrians to deal straightly to arrive to a satisfactory understanding with you. I confidently hope that you will help me in my efforts to smooth over difficulties that may still arise.Your very sincere and devoted friend and cousinWilly
Kaiser to Tsar29 July 1914, 6.30 p.m.Berlin, 29 July 1914I received your telegram and share your wish that peace should be maintained.But as I told you in my first telegram, I cannot consider Austria’s action against Servia an “ignoble” war. Austria knows by experience that Servian promises ono paper are wholly unreliable. I understand its action must be judged as trending to get full guarantee that the Servian promises shall become real facts. This my reasoning is borne out by the statement of the Austrian cabinet that Austria does not want to make any territorial conquests at the expense of Servia.I therefore suggest that it would be quite possible for Russia to remain a spectator of the austro-servian conflict without involving Europe in the most horrible war she ever witnessed. I think a direct understanding between your Government and Vienna possible and desirable, and as I already telegraphed to you, my Government is continuing its exercises to promote it.Of course military measures on the part of Russia would be looked upon by Austria as a calamity we both wish to avoid and jeopardize my position as mediator which I readily accepted on your appeal to my friendship and my help.Willy

Tsar to Kaiser29 July 1914, 8.20 p.m.Peter’s Court Palace, 29 July 1914Thanks for your telegram conciliatory and friendly. Whereas official message presented today by your ambassador to my minister was conveyed in a very different tone. Beg you to explain this divergency! It would be right to give over the Austro-servian problem to the Hague conference. Trust in your wisdom and friendship.Your loving Nicky

teatimeatwinterpalace:

The German Emperor, Wilhelm II, and the Russian Tsar, Nicholas II, exchanged telegrams in the immediate run-up to the outbreak of war between 29 July 1914 and 1 August 1914.

Tsar to Kaiser
29 July 1914, 1 a.m.

Peter’s Court Palais, 29 July 1914

Sa Majesté l’Empereur
Neues Palais

Am glad you are back. In this serious moment, I appeal to you to help me. An ignoble war has been declared to a weak country. The indignation in Russia shared fully by me is enormous. I foresee that very soon I shall be overwhelmed by the pressure forced upon me and be forced to take extreme measures which will lead to war. To try and avoid such a calamity as a European war I beg you in the name of our old friendship to do what you can to stop your allies from going too far.

Kaiser to Tsar
29 July 1914, 1.45 a.m. (this and the previous telegraph crossed)

28 July 1914

It is with the gravest concern that I hear of the impression which the action of Austria against Serbia is creating in your country.

The unscrupulous agitation that has been going on in Serbia for years has resulted in the outrageous crime, to which Archduke Francis Ferdinand fell a victim. The spirit that led Serbians to murder their own king and his wife still dominates the country.

You will doubtless agree with me that we both, you and me, have a common interest as well as all Sovereigns to insist that all the persons morally responsible for the dastardly murder should receive their deserved punishment. In this case politics plays no part at all.

On the other hand, I fully understand how difficult it is for you and your Government to face the drift of your public opinion. Therefore, with regard to the hearty and tender friendship which binds us both from long ago with firm ties, I am exerting my utmost influence to induce the Austrians to deal straightly to arrive to a satisfactory understanding with you. I confidently hope that you will help me in my efforts to smooth over difficulties that may still arise.

Your very sincere and devoted friend and cousin

Willy

Kaiser to Tsar
29 July 1914, 6.30 p.m.

Berlin, 29 July 1914

I received your telegram and share your wish that peace should be maintained.

But as I told you in my first telegram, I cannot consider Austria’s action against Servia an “ignoble” war. Austria knows by experience that Servian promises ono paper are wholly unreliable. I understand its action must be judged as trending to get full guarantee that the Servian promises shall become real facts. This my reasoning is borne out by the statement of the Austrian cabinet that Austria does not want to make any territorial conquests at the expense of Servia.

I therefore suggest that it would be quite possible for Russia to remain a spectator of the austro-servian conflict without involving Europe in the most horrible war she ever witnessed. I think a direct understanding between your Government and Vienna possible and desirable, and as I already telegraphed to you, my Government is continuing its exercises to promote it.

Of course military measures on the part of Russia would be looked upon by Austria as a calamity we both wish to avoid and jeopardize my position as mediator which I readily accepted on your appeal to my friendship and my help.

Willy

Tsar to Kaiser
29 July 1914, 8.20 p.m.

Peter’s Court Palace, 29 July 1914

Thanks for your telegram conciliatory and friendly. Whereas official message presented today by your ambassador to my minister was conveyed in a very different tone. Beg you to explain this divergency! It would be right to give over the Austro-servian problem to the Hague conference. Trust in your wisdom and friendship.

Your loving Nicky

artschoolglasses:

A window in Louis XVI’s dining room.

artschoolglasses:

A window in Louis XVI’s dining room.

teatimeatwinterpalace:

28th July 1914 - Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia

On July 28, 1914, one month to the day after Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife were killed by a Serbian nationalist in Sarajevo, Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia, effectively beginning the First World War.

The following telegram sent by Count Leopold von Berchtold (Austro-Hungarian Foreign Minister) at 11.10 am to M. N. Pashitch (Serbian Prime Minister and Foreign Minister), who received it at 12.30 pmVienna28 July 1914The Royal Serbian Government not having answered in a satisfactory manner the note of July 23, 1914, presented by the Austro-Hungarian Minister at Belgrade, the Imperial and Royal Government are themselves compelled to see to the safeguarding of their rights and interests, and, with this object, to have recourse to force of arms.Austria-Hungary consequently considers herself henceforward in state of war with Serbia.Count Berchtold

teatimeatwinterpalace:

28th July 1914 - Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia

On July 28, 1914, one month to the day after Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife were killed by a Serbian nationalist in Sarajevo, Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia, effectively beginning the First World War.

The following telegram sent by Count Leopold von Berchtold (Austro-Hungarian Foreign Minister) at 11.10 am to M. N. Pashitch (Serbian Prime Minister and Foreign Minister), who received it at 12.30 pm

Vienna
28 July 1914

The Royal Serbian Government not having answered in a satisfactory manner the note of July 23, 1914, presented by the Austro-Hungarian Minister at Belgrade, the Imperial and Royal Government are themselves compelled to see to the safeguarding of their rights and interests, and, with this object, to have recourse to force of arms.

Austria-Hungary consequently considers herself henceforward in state of war with Serbia.

Count Berchtold

memory-of-the-romanovs:

Day of solemn entry into Moscow of Their Imperial Majesties, a few days before the coronation (May 9, 1896).
The carriage of Empress Alexandra Feodorovna.

memory-of-the-romanovs:

Day of solemn entry into Moscow of Their Imperial Majesties, a few days before the coronation (May 9, 1896).

The carriage of Empress Alexandra Feodorovna.

Studying For Funsies - CARRIAGES

18thcenturylove:

Sooo like a true history peep, I take notes on random bits of historical history. This week, carriages! :D (forgive me if I made a mistake!)

BAROUCHE

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BERLINE

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CABRIOLET

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CALASH (also name for folding top on BAROUCHE, CHAISE and VICTORIA)

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almyro:

governmentname:

mrabelrants:

US provides proof Vladimir Putin personally fired a missile that took down #MH17

damn susan rice lookin mannish lately

saying that the White House has this much evidence is actually a bit too generous in this case to be honest

almyro:

governmentname:

mrabelrants:

US provides proof Vladimir Putin personally fired a missile that took down #MH17

damn susan rice lookin mannish lately

saying that the White House has this much evidence is actually a bit too generous in this case to be honest

kritseldis:

Two educational postcards reminding the children about the road rules. Artist M. Fuks, 1975-1976

The first card also has a poem on back (even if no one is marked as author):

See, kes kord tänava seadusi teab,
enam naljalt ohtu ei satu.
Miilitsasaua ees peatuma peab
autojuht, olgu kui ohjeldamatu.

afp-photo:

-, Sevastopol : Sailors of the Russian Black Sea Fleet march as they prepare for Navy Day celebrations in the Crimean city of Sevastopol on July 25, 2014. Russia announced on July 23, 2014 that it had begun expanding and modernising its Black Sea fleet based in Crimea with new ships and submarines, just months after annexing the peninsula from Ukraine. Russia’s Black Sea fleet had a base at the historic port city of Sevastopol in Crimea under an agreement with Ukraine before Russia annexed the peninsula in March 2014. AFP PHOTO/MAX VETROV

afp-photo:

-, Sevastopol : Sailors of the Russian Black Sea Fleet march as they prepare for Navy Day celebrations in the Crimean city of Sevastopol on July 25, 2014. Russia announced on July 23, 2014 that it had begun expanding and modernising its Black Sea fleet based in Crimea with new ships and submarines, just months after annexing the peninsula from Ukraine. Russia’s Black Sea fleet had a base at the historic port city of Sevastopol in Crimea under an agreement with Ukraine before Russia annexed the peninsula in March 2014. AFP PHOTO/MAX VETROV

teatimeatwinterpalace:

Imperial Russia Meme | M U S I C I A N | Pyotr Ilich Tchaikovsky

Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky was the author of some of the most popular themes in all of classical music. He founded no school, struck out no new paths or compositional methods, and sought few innovations in his works. Yet the power and communicative sweep of his best music elevates it to classic status, even if it lacks the formal boldness and harmonic sophistication heard in the compositions of his contemporaries, Wagner and Bruckner. It was Tchaikovsky’s unique melodic charm that could, whether in his Piano Concerto No. 1 or in his ballet The Nutcracker or in his tragic last symphony, make the music sound familiar on first hearing.

Tchaikovsky was born into a family of five brothers and one sister. He began taking piano lessons at age four and showed remarkable talent, eventually surpassing his own teacher’s abilities. By age nine, he exhibited severe nervous problems, not least because of his overly sensitive nature. The following year, he was sent to St. Petersburg to study at the School of Jurisprudence. The loss of his mother in 1854 dealt a crushing blow to the young Tchaikovsky. In 1859, he took a position in the Ministry of Justice, but longed for a career in music, attending concerts and operas at every opportunity. He finally began study in harmony with Zaremba in 1861, and enrolled at the St. Petersburg Conservatory the following year, eventually studying composition with Anton Rubinstein..

(Source: classicalarchives.com)

greenborschevik:

Girl With a Wooden Box.                                                                                          
Ivan Kulikov, 1912, Russian painter.

greenborschevik:

Girl With a Wooden Box.                                                                                          

Ivan Kulikov, 1912, Russian painter.

sovietpostcards:

One of my favourite postcard sets ever — Leningrad’s Cast Iron Lace (1980). I love everything about it: the fences, the winter, the black and white.

I only sell it because I have another one for myself. :)

buy on etsy

queenrhaenyra:

→ Marie Antoinette + Scenery

Self portraits by Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna of Russia. 1920.